Border Collie Rescue - On Line - CollieLaw
Webband

CollieLaw is the name of our main welfare program.

It is in two parts -
Part one supports older and disabled dogs we re-home.
Part two offers small emergency grants to people with Border Collies on state benefits.

Part one - The CollieLaw Retirement Scheme

We are regularly asked to take in and re-home older or disabled dogs.
Unfortunately not many people come to us specifically asking for such dogs and they can be difficult to re-home.

The Collielaw Retirement Scheme is simply a long term re-homing program where an older dog can be taken into a permanent home for the rest of its life and where Border Collie Rescue will provide some financial support for the dog in the home in the case of an emergency requiring veterinary intervention or for long term medication.
It can fit into a Fostering or Adoption arrangement as a shared responsibility.

Dogs re-homed with long term medical conditions, certain disabilities and some over 12 years old with potential health issues can qualify for this scheme, but it would only apply if there was the potential of an issue arising in the future as a result of a condition the dog had when in our care.
It would not automatically apply to every elderly or disabled dog we re-home.

Each case is considered individually. Some dogs would be entered on the scheme before being offered for re-homing
Adoption of a dog on the scheme is undertaken on the basis of an individual formal agreement between Border Collie Rescue and the home.

There is a short video outlining the CollieLaw Retirement Scheme underneath the information below

On the basis of Adoption, this is how it works

An applicant adopts a qualifying dog to be a permanent resident for the rest of its natural life and looks after the day to day needs of the dog as if they had adopted it normally.
This includes food, annual vaccinations and other normal 'maintenance' requirements they would have supplied to any dog they owned or had adopted.

Depending on the arrangement with Border Collie Rescue, if the dog has an existing medical condition or disability or it becomes ill or infirm as a result of a condition it suffered from at the time of adoption, Border Collie Rescue will contribute to the additional costs of veterinary treatment and medication within the limits agreed between Border Collie Rescue and the adoptee at the commencement of the adoption.

In certain cases where long term regular medication is required, Border Collie Rescue may provide the medication at no cost to the adoptee by a direct arrangement with their veterinary practice.
Border Collie Rescue may also, from time to time, elect to contribute towards other aspects of the dogs care, at its discretion, over and above those formally agreed.

Although any treatment would normally be undertaken by a veterinary practice elected by the adoptee, Border Collie Rescue will reserve the right to elect a particular veterinary practice to undertake treatment or supply of medication, in which case the charity will undertake to cover the whole cost of the treatment or medication, irrespective of any limit on its agreed contribution and the home may contribute towards this cost by voluntary donation if they wish.

As part of the agreement, at any time during the period of the agreement, the home may give an agreed notice period and pass the dog back into the care of Border Collie Rescue. This is a normal conditon of all our adoption agreements.
Alternatively, if they want - at any time - they can opt out of the agreement and retain the dog under normal adoption terms, releasing Border Collie Rescue from any future responsibility.
If an adoptee makes this choice they still have the option, under our normal adoption terms, to end the adoption and pass the dog back to the care of Border Collie Rescue if they are unable to keep the dog - for any reason.

For the duration of the agreement the dog would stay in the adoptees home under our normal adoption terms overlaid by the CollieLaw agreement.
With fostering we would still be looking for a permanent home for the fostered dog and if found, the dog would go off to its new home and another dog offered to the foster home.
This will not happen on the adopted level of the Collielaw Retirement Scheme.

Border Collie Rescue is reliant on public support and donations for its income and therefore has to limit its spending accordingly. This program would be financed by our Welfare Fund and our ability to contribute to the care of a dog would be dependent on the level of money in this fund.
There would be a risk that funding could become too low to support dogs on the scheme and this proviso would be part of any agreement.
In the case of Border Collie Rescue being obliged to withdraw from supporting a dog under the scheme the adoptee would have the choice of opting out of the agreement by either returning the dog to Border Collie Rescue or retaining the dog under normal adoption terms and releasing Border Collie Rescue from future responsibility.

If circumstances arose where Border Collie Rescue was unable to contribute to the limit stipulated in the formal agreement and the adoptee took the option of retaining the dog under normal adoption terms and releasing Border Collie Rescue from future responsibility, Border Collie Rescue would contact the adoptee when additional funds became available to enable CollieLaw support to be re-instated and the adoptee would have the option of entering into the scheme again under the original terms.

Border Collie Rescue will reserve the right to take the dog back into its care if the terms of the agreement were breached by the adoptee.

Otherwise, the dog will stay with an adoptee for the rest of its life or for as long as they wanted it to.

On the basis of Fostering, this is how it works

Any dog fostered on behalf of Border Collie Rescue has all its veterinary, care and dietry needs covered by the charity.
This included dogs that are long term fostered under the CollieLaw scheme.
Foster carers have the option of taking on some of the financial responsibility of a dog in their care or making donations to Border Collie Rescue as they see fit but the charity will always cover all costs of fostering while a dog is in their care.

Foster carers need to be formally signed up 'Active Members' of Border Collie Rescue and to have been working within the organisation on a voluntary basis for at least one year before they can qualify for fostering

Once qualified on the basis of time served to apply to be a fosterer carer the applicant is assessed on their ability to look after, train and care for dogs that may be placed with them and if neccesary undergo some training before taking on the role

Unlike normal fostering, which is generally short term with the dogs placed being based on the foster carers abilties to progress their journey towards re-homing, fostering under the CollieLaw scheme is long term and the arrangement contains additional conditions relating to long term care and the comitment to the stability of the home to the dog receiving it.

As in any fostering situation, Border Collie Rescue will always look for a permanent home a the dog in its care and if one is found the charity will re-home the dog accordingly.

Under the CollieLaw Scheme a foster carer will always be consulted before an adoptee is offered a dog they are fostering and will have the option of switching their agreement to that of adoption if a permenant home is found and they wish to retian the dog.

For more details of fostering a dog , follow this link

A video about The CollieLaw Retirement Scheme showing some dogs it supported.

The name 'CollieLaw' was inspired by, and is used in honour of, the late Frank and Margaret Moyes who adopted many old dogs from Border Collie Rescue over many years and looked after them all at their own expense even though they were offered support on each occasion.
Our support program was given it's name shortly after Frank's death.

Frank was a professional photographer and took many photo's of dogs working in the fields and hills and also for the International Sheepdog Society at sheepdog trials around the UK.
His photo's also illustrate many books on sheepdogs and shepherding by internationally respected authors and he has always had a great love and respect for the Border Collie.

Margaret (Maggie) was a lover of all animals, a gentle soul who in spite of her own ill health nursed and cared for old and disabled dogs, lavishing love and attention to all that were lucky enough to find themselves living out their final years in their home in Scotland.

The house they all lived in was named 'Collielaw'.

This video was recorded after Maggie's death. Frank had been diagnosed with cancer and was in a retirement home where he was regarded as a very cheeky chappy by the other residents because of his great spirit and sense of humour. He was particularly admired by the ladies!

The CollieLaw retirement Scheme was set up in tribute to Frank and Maggie who were great friends to Border Collies and Border Collie Rescue and to many of us personally.
Greatly respected, greatly loved and greatly missed.

If you are interested in adopting under the Collielaw Retirement Scheme, contact us on 0845 604 4941 during office hours
(2 pm to 5 pm weekdays)
Please do not write to us or email us about such matters - we want to speak to you before we start the process.

Part two - The CollieLaw Support Scheme

This aspect of CollieLaw is there to help people with Border Collies who are suffering financial difficulties by providing small grants towards food, dietary supplements, equiptment or veterinary costs on the basis that the lack of such impairs the health or quality of life of the dog concerned.

Funding and support can also be made available to other charitable bodies for specific Border Collies in their care.

This is how it works for private individuals

Grants are only available to owners of Border Collies.

To qualify the dogs owner must be receiving state benefit on a basic level and be able to provide evidence of such.
In the case of couples or extended families with adults in the household who are over 18 years and in employement, the joint income of the family would have to be considered. Reciept of Tax credits, pensions and other supplements to an earned income would not normally qualify.

All grants are at the discretion of the trustees of Border Collie Rescue.

Grants in cash are paid directly to the supplier of services the grant is intended for.
If for dog food, the pet shop or supplier, if for veterinary aid of any kind, the veterinary practice providing the service or for emergency accommodation, the kennel where the dog is boarded

Grants would not normally exceed £100 and only one grant can be applied for annually.

A grant would have to be used on a specified Border Collie in their care.

Border Collie Rescue reserves the right to provide any grant service directly.
This may mean we supply dog food, supplements or equipment from our own supplies or arrange services or supplies from a veterinary practice we are registered with or chose.


This is how it works for Charitable Bodies

Any organisation seeking a grant would need to be either -

 - A registered charity in England, Scotland or Wales.
 - A properly constituted charitable body, qualifying for registered charity status but below the registration income threshold.
 - A properly constituted charitable body in the process of registering with the appropriate regulator.
 - An organisation incorporated as a non-profit making charitable company limited by guarantee who's memorandum and articles fit into the Charity Commission or OSCR guidelines to be accepted as as a charitable body and are recognised as such by HMRC.

All grants are at the discretion of the trustees of Border Collie Rescue.

Grants in cash are paid directly to the supplier of services the grant is intended for.

Border Collie Rescue reserves the right to provide any grant service directly.
This may mean we supply dog food, supplements or equipment from our own supplies or arrange services or supplies from a veterinary practice we are registered with or chose.

Grants have a limit of £500 or equivalent value and only one grant can be applied for annually.

A grant would have to be used on a specified Border Collie in their care.

Proof of legal status and current financial status, along with a copy of the previous years accounts would need to be provided.


We would advise everyone to get their pet insured these days. If you use the PDSA you will be supporting a charity.
For details of the PDSA insurance scheme use the link below.
The PDSA Pet Insurance Website

If you have never had a Pet Border Collie before we would suggest you did a bit of research on the suitability of this breed for your environment and circumstances Check out our Breed Advice section on this website.

If you would like to offer a particular type of home to a rescued Border Collie, click on the appropriate link in the sliding menu on the left to find out more.

If you are interested in adopting a Border Collie from us, please phone 0845 604 4941 during office hours.
(2 pm to 5 pm weekdays)

Please do not write to us or email us about adoption - we want to speak to you before we start the process.